Peninsula Macrobiotic Network Newsletter  
Number 127 December 2007 / January 2008 Peninsula Macrobiotic Community
 

Welcome
to the
Newsletter
of the
Peninsula Macrobiotic Community
in Palo Alto,
California!

For information on our organization, click on About Us.

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     Scenes from the Gourmet Vegetarian Dinners in Palo Alto

 
 
How do I attend the Gourmet Vegetarian Dinners?
 
Chef Gary Alinder, since 1987
Every Monday, 6:30 PM
First Baptist Church, Palo Alto
305 North California Avenue
at Bryant
1/4 mile East of Alma
Sit Down or Take-out, $14
Reservations Requested:
Call 650 599-3320 by
Monday 9:30 AM.
 
Open to everyone. Communal seating--new people easily integrate into our friendly group, which includes many singles. Make new friends on Mondays!

   
 
Coming Events
 
Monday, December 10
Dr. Jenny Lee speaks on Natural Solutions to Digestive Problems.
 
Monday, December 24
No Dinner, Happy Holidays!
 
Monday, December 31
No Dinner, Happy Holidays!
 
Monday, January 14
Julie Ong speaks on Macrobiotic Journey: From Migraines to Intuition and Spirituality.
 
   
 
News and Announcements
Make a date with a friend to meet at a Monday Dinner, or come by yourself and make new friends! Either way, you'll get a great meal and a lot more--everyone wins!

Help publicize the Monday Dinners! An easy way to spread the word about our weekly community gathering is to click on the Tell-A-Friend link in the upper left of this page. Just fill out the form with the email addresses of up to two friends, along with any personal comments you'd like to add, and click Submit--this emails your comments along with pre-written details of the Dinners and a link to this website!

Another way to help is to post a copy of our Dinner Menus in public locations. For a pdf file suitable for printing, click here.

Best Wishes for a Safe and Happy Holiday Season, and a Happy New Year! Dinner will not be served on Dec 24 and Dec 31.

Thank you to those who have contributed to our Fundraising Drive. If you have not yet contributed, your help is needed--donations to the Peninsula Macrobiotic Community (PMC) are accepted in any amount. $10/year is suggested to support the newsletter; larger amounts are applied to both the newsletter and other expenses, primarily insurance, and will also give us additional operating flexibility to handle rising costs. See From The Editor for details on contributing by mail. Donations, including $10 amounts to support the newsletter, are tax-deductible, as the PMC is a nonprofit organization.

Monthly Vegan Potlucks! The Peninsula Veggie Potluck People, a spinoff of the Monday Dinners, sponsor monthly vegan potlucks; for details, visit http://pvpp.org. To host a potluck, call Diane Wohler at 650 704-0669, or Harold Stephenson at 650 856-1125.

Yoga on Wednesday mornings! Open to grace with Anusara influenced yoga--based on precise biomechanical principles of alignment, inner body awareness, and a celebration of life. Taught with enthusiasm, love, and gratitude by Patricia Becker at 2121 Staunton Court (at the corner of Oxford), Palo Alto, near Common Ground Organic Garden Supply, 8 to 9 am. Please come 10 minutes early with a smile, a yoga mat and yoga block for maximum enjoyment. All levels welcome! $7 to $10 sliding scale. Information: 650 494-1620.

The North Bay Macrobiotic Potluck Group usually meets the first Sunday of each month in Santa Rosa, contact Stephen Starkweather (), 707 542-9739, http://www.northbaymacro.org.

Veteran macrobiotic teachers David and Cynthia Briscoe of Macrobiotics America in Oroville, CA have just unveiled a new website, http://www.macroamerica.com, filled with practical information on macrobiotics. They offer a variety of classes online.
   
 
Winter Solstice Celebration!
 
December 17, 2007
 
Sparkling Fruit Punch

Bread Basket

French Onion Soup with Croutons

Neat Loaf with Herbed Mushroom Gravy

Mashed Butternut Squash and Sweet Potatoes

Sweet and Tart Red Cabbage

Mixed Green and Radicchio Salad with Dried Cranberries, Apples, Caramelized Pecans, and Cranberry Vinaigrette

Figgy Pudding Cake with Blood Orange Tofu Crème

Selection of Teas

$18 Sitdown, $16 Takeout

More Dinner Menus...

 
Cooking and Classes
James Holloway, frequent Guest Chef at the Monday Dinners, does personal home cooking in Palo Alto, in macrobiotic and classical styles, call 650 852-9182.

Marin-based cookbook author, lecturer, and macrobiotic food coach Meredith McCarty offers two cooking classes in Oakland (Saturday 3-5:00 pm, Manzanita Restaurant, 1050 40th St.) and Mill Valley (Tuesday 6-8:30 pm, Homestead Valley Community Center, 315 Montford Ave.):
· Staying Healthy through the Holidays (Dec 11 and 15)
· Palate-Pleasing Recipes with Winter Squash (Jan 15 and 19)
$50/class, information at http://healingcuisine.com, 415 381-1735.

Macrobiotic Chef Julie Ong teaches a macrobiotic cooking class on the first Saturday of every month at Manzanita Restaurant, 4001 Linden St (at 40th), Oakland, 3-5:30 pm, $45, call 415 312-0241 to register. Visit http://omkariwholisticliving.com for information.

After-Dinner Events
Speakers receive a gratuity from the audience; please show your support and appreciation with a donation ($5-10 suggested).

On December 10, Herbalist and Licensed Acupuncturist Dr. Jenny Lee will speak on Natural Solutions to Digestive Problems. Acid reflux, hiatal hernias, ulcers, irritable bowel syndrome, colitis, and Crohn's disease are just a few of the digestive disorders that affect over 61 million Americans each year. In the year 2000, pharmaceutical companies sold more than 96 billion dollars in drugs to treat digestive-related conditions.

Dr. Lee will explain how the digestive system works, and how stress affects digestion. She will describe some common digestive problems, natural approaches to those problems, and preventative measures. She will also teach tongue analysis to diagnose your own health, and do a free nutritional organ scan on each participant to detect any weak organs.

Born in Taiwan as a fourth generation Chinese Medicine practitioner, Dr. Lee has been exposed to Chinese Medicine and herbs since childhood. She trained in both Western and Traditional Chinese Medicine. Before specializing in Chinese Medicine, she worked for Kaiser Permanente Hospital in the field of Radiologic Technology. She attended the prestigious American College of Traditional Chinese Medicine in San Francisco, and received advanced acupuncture training and graduated from Xuan-Wu Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine in Beijing, China. For more information about Dr. Lee and her many other healing interests including energy healing, muscle testing and others, visit her website http://healinglab.com.  
 
You must have failed deeply on some level or experienced some deep loss or pain to be drawn to the spiritual dimension. Or perhaps your very success became empty and meaningless and so turned out to be a failure.
Eckhart Tolle
The great awareness comes slowly, piece by piece. The path of spiritual growth is a path of lifelong learning. The experience of spiritual power is basically a joyful one.
M Scott Peck
   
 
Suffering from the debilitating effects of migraine headaches for 20 years, Julie S. Ong researched and tried everything, including supplements, drugs, physical therapy, and acupressure. Like many people, she found that there was no simple cause and effect, or magic bullet cure. Getting no results from standard, external approaches, she began to look inward through self-reflection.

Eventually she came upon macrobiotics. Eating macrobiotically, especially whole grains, stabilized and calmed her, reducing occurrences of her migraines and improving her ability to deal with them when they did occur. She also started to discover her own intuition, through cooking for herself and directly experiencing the effects first-hand. She began to trust her intuition more and more.

This was paralleled by a growing interest in spirituality--she began to ponder questions like, "What does it mean to be alive and to die?" She started to view her migraines from a new perspective, as a really powerful message from her body for attention and respect. They were also an incentive to grow as a person, intuitively and spiritually. For Julie, her migraines had changed, incredibly, from a source of debilitating pain, to something to be grateful for.

Join us on January 14 when Macrobiotic Counselor Julie S. Ong shares her Macrobiotic Journey: From Migraines to Intuition and Spirituality. A recent graduate of the Kushi Institute, the world-renowned leader in macrobiotics, Julie is a certified macrobiotic counselor, spiritual life coach, and natural chef. What began as a way to find relief for debilitating migraines turned into a journey of self-discovery. She is passionate about coaching her clients from the wholistic view of macrobiotics, to nurture the self-transforming process of developing one's own intuition and spirituality. She is currently a head chef at Manzanita Restaurant in Oakland, specializing in organic vegan macrobiotic cuisine. Visit http://omkariwholisticliving.com for more information on Julie ("Omkari" is her spiritual name).
Brown Rice Croquettes
This recipe is beneficial for preventing migraines. To keep liver energy from rising too quickly and getting stuck in the head, it is important to eat foods that support the liver and large intestine. Brown rice helps support the large intestine, by grounding the energy in the hara region. The harmonizing energy of umeboshi paste balances liver energy. Finally, the pungent flavor and upward rising energy of scallions nourish the large intestine and liver respectively.

Yield: 12 servings

Ingredients:
  • 2 cups brown rice
  • 4 cups water
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 2 tablespoons umeboshi paste
  • 1 tablespoon tahini (optional)
  • 3 medium scallions--sliced thin
  • 2 tablespoons grapeseed oil (optional)
  • 2 tablespoons sesame seeds--black, toasted
  • 3 tablespoons tamari soy sauce
In a pressure cooker, soak brown rice in water overnight. Add salt and cover. Bring to pressure and cook for 50 minutes.

To cooled rice, stir in tahini and chopped scallions. Wet hands and shape rice into balls. Dig a hole inside each one and insert 1/4 teaspoon umeboshi paste. Flatten and shape rice into croquettes.

Garnish with black sesame seeds. Serve with soy sauce.

Optional: Heat oil in skillet and pan fry each croquette until browned on each side.

Copyright © 2007 Julie S. Ong
Community Connection
From The Editor
Email Notification of Newsletter: To receive an email notification each time the Newsletter and Dinner Menus are published on this site (every two months), .
 
Mailing List Policy: To get a printed copy of the Newsletter and Dinner Menus delivered by postal mail, or call the phone number below. To offset the expense of producing the Newsletter and Menus, we suggest a contribution of $10/year or more. The date and amount of your last newsletter contribution appears on your mailing label. Write checks to "Peninsula Macrobiotic Community", and mail to Gerard Lum, 101 E. Middlefield Road #9, Mountain View, CA 94043, 650 903-0447.

We periodically review our mailing list. Those who have not made a recent contribution are subject to removal.

Tax-Deductible Contributions: We welcome and can use additional contributions to the Peninsula Macrobiotic Community, as income from the Dinners does not pay all of our expenses. We are a nonprofit organization, so additional contributions are fully tax-deductible. Send contributions to the address in Mailing List Policy above.

Back Issues of the Newsletter and Menus: Click here.

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